Join Math Team

You may be discouraged from joining the math team because you don’t think you’re not good at it, but like many other things in life, you can get better at math by working hard at it and with the proper attitude. All you need is a love of math, the desire to make yourself better, and a winning attitude. If you don’t like math, then maybe joining math team can change your opinion on math. At math competitions, you commonly get problems that require you to think outside the box and think of creative solutions, unlike traditional high school math. If you are interested or just want to try it out, talk to your school’s math team coach and ask him or her about joining the team. He or she would be more than willing to help you out. If your school doesn’t have a team and you want to start one, take initiative and find a teacher who is willing to sponsor and coach a math team. There are lots of math competitions in Georgia every year, where you get a chance at showing off your math skills, finding opportunities to improve, and simply having fun. If you see a problem you don’t understand, don’t feel discouraged. If you are willing to learn the tricks, you will get better and better at it, and eventually, if you do consistently well at math competitions, you can make it on one of Georgia’s state ARML teams, where the best are selected from all over Georgia to compete in a competition involving teams from all over the US and even from other countries, like Colombia and China. You get to interact with kids who love math just like you from all over Georgia and stay at a dorm at the University of Georgia to #DoMaTh and/or socialize with the kids and compete for a chance for fun and international glory.

Mathematical Induction

Why I Don’t Like Mathematical Induction

Everybody has opinions, and you can even have opinions about math. I, for one, don’t particularly like the method of mathematical induction. Why? Because it doesn’t completely tell you “why”. For example, you can use mathematical induction to prove that 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + … + n = n(n+1)/2. Great, we know that the formula works, but where does the formula come from? A much more elegant method to prove that formula is derivation. There are many ways to derive that formula, and one method is by writing 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + … + n forwards and backwards and by adding them together twice. That way, you can see how twice the sum would be n(n+1) (see the visual), so the sum would be n(n+1)/2. By deriving the formula, you see why the formula is the way it is, and you’ll be able to connect the formula to the nature of the series. Also, mathematical induction is not a method to make equations, as it can only be used if the equation is given. With induction, you may prove old equations, but with derivation, you’ll be able to make new equations.

Pythagorean Triplets

Cool Thing About Pythagorean Triplets

There is a cool property of all odd numbers except one, they can all form Pythagorean triplets. A Pythagorean triplet is any set of positive integers a, b, and c that satisfy the equation a2 + b2 = c2. For example, a= 3, b= 4, and c= 5 is a Pythagorean triplet because 32 + 42 = 52. If a is any odd number except 1, it can make a Pythagorean Triplet of the form a= a, b= (a2 – 1)/2, and c= (a2 – 1)/2 + 1, or b + 1. You can prove this by substituting b and c with b= (a2 – 1)/2 and c= (a2 – 1)/2 + 1 in the equation a2 + b2 = c2. “a” cannot be even for this case because if a were even, (a2 -1)/2 would not be a whole number, and a cannot be one, because then, b would be zero. For all other odd numbers, this would work, and Pythagorean Triplets of this form include…

a= 5, b= 12, c= 13

a= 7, b= 24, c= 25

a= 9, b= 40, c= 41

Setting Goals

Setting Goals for the Semester

As you progress through a semester, it is important to continuously assess your progress and set new goals for yourself. This is an important thing to do because it makes you more aware of how you are performing and helps you to create a focused path for the remainder of the term. Furthermore, setting goals helps you to better organize your limited time and resources available as well as improve your motivation

Assess Your Progress:

The first step to goal-setting is to assess your current progress. This includes knowing the grades you have received as well as the study habits you used to get them. Make a note of whether you have been doing things like reading the textbook, taking notes in class, completing your homework or thoroughly reviewing before tests. It is also important to assess how well you understand the course material as well as if your grades match your perceived understanding.

Decide What You Want from the Class:

Before setting defined goals, it is important to think about what you want to get out of the class. Do you want a good grade to raise your GPA? Do you want a strong foundation on a topic that will be important later in your curriculum? Do you want to be more knowledgeable about a subject that interests you? Knowing what you specifically want from a course will give you the motivation to keep focused and continue to work hard.

Setting Goals:

Now that you know how you are doing in your courses and what you want to gain from them, it is time to set goals for yourself.

Set goals for things you would like to see occur. For example, maintaining or improving your grades, study habits or your understanding of certain topics. It is important that your goals are both reasonable and specific to keep you motivated and focused.

In addition to setting goals, you need to create a plan to help you reach them. To get the grades that you want, you must understand what study habits you will need to have. Also, you must assess if you need extra help and find out what resources are available to you. The internet may have additional explanations and examples of topics. Additionally, your teacher may be able to give you additional help outside of class. Don’t forget that MaThCliX is also a great resource!

Once you’ve set goals and created a plan for yourself, you will be on track for a focused and productive term. Following the ideas discussed above will help you stay motivated while providing with the skills and resources to get the most out the courses you are taking.

 

 

Master the Digits of Pi

Three Strategies to Conquer MaThCliX Digits of Pi Contest

On March 14th, MaThCliX will be hosting our third annual Pi Day, which is filled with a variety of activities for students of all ages. The most anticipated event of the day is the “Digits of Pi” Contest. The rules are simple: whoever wants to participate merely has to recite as many digits of Pi, the famous irrational number, as they can (in order, of course). The person that says the most digits of Pi accurately wins a Pi Day t-shirt and a pie/cake! Good luck to everyone competing; I hope you find these tips useful! (P.S. make sure you have the correct digits of Pi pulled up on your phone or computer while attempting to memorize it.)

Strategy #1:

One way to memorize the digits of Pi effectively is through auditory learning. Look at the first 5 digits of Pi and say each one of them out loud. Repeat the process four more times while still looking at the correct form of Pi to guide you. Then look away and try to say the five digits by memory. If you get it correct the first time, then repeat it four more times while looking away. However, if you get it wrong the first time, look back at the correct form and repeat the five digits five times while looking again. Next, attempt to say it five times without looking (successfully this time, hopefully). Repeat these steps until you feel like you have those five digits glued to your brain. If you can use this strategy every day for 10 days before the contest, you will have memorized the first 50 digits of Pi!

Strategy #2:

Carry around a piece of paper with Pi written on it. Whenever you have a minute to spare either in the classroom or at home, take out the piece of paper and begin writing the digits of Pi by memory, as many as you can do. Then look at the correct form of Pi and assess how you did. Next, write it again, maybe this time adding one or two digits on to the end. If you make this a habit for a week or two before the contest, you are bound for success.

Strategy #3:

This final strategy is based off the idea that it is easier to remember numbers that have a purpose rather than a random sea of numbers. What you do is assign phone numbers to each set of ten digits in Pi and then attempt to memorize each phone number. It helps to set patterns within the phone numbers to better remember them: make the first letter of the name for the first phone number an “A”, the first letter of the name for the second phone number a “B”, etc. Also, try making the numbers of letter in each name correspond with the first number in that phone number. Try memorizing one phone number every 2 days, and in 10 days you will know 50 digits.

Everyone is different, so a technique that works for one person might not work for another. Experiment with different memorization techniques and find which one works best for YOU. Also, just a reminder: last year’s winner recited 108 digits of Pi. Good luck, and we’ll see you on March 14th!

Keeping Focused in Classes You Don’t Enjoy

By Tyler Mathena

Nobody likes every subject in school. Teachers love to pretend that their subject is fascinating to everybody because they like it, but it is pretty clear that is not the case. Many students are passionate about history, others prefer english, and some (like myself) love math and science. As a student, I know how difficult it is to justify learning material in classes that aren’t your favorite, but it is important to learn every subject.

Every subject, regardless of how bizarre or boring, can be applied to real life. Math is everywhere, every job has to write occasionally, and past events are extremely relevant and can help you understand why the world is the way that it is. Also, learning to pay attention and feign interest in these subjects can help you learn how to learn. In your future job, no matter what it is, there will be things you have to learn that you may think are not important. Learning these subjects that you do not like in school makes learning these skills much easier and can make you seem mature to your employer.

Additionally, if you walk into a class convinced that you are going to despise it, then you will. Keep an open mind and maybe you will be surprised. I have a history of disliking social studies classes, so I was not hopeful when I walked into the first day of Microeconomics. I kept an open mind though, and it turned out to be my favorite class of the semester. That single class inspired me to minor in business in college. Keeping an open mind can be tough when you know that you dislike similar classes, but it definitely pays off in the long run.

I know better than anyone that it is hard to stay awake in that one terrible class (we all have one!). Lucky for you, I have learned and stolen some tricks over the years that can make any class bearable. My best advice is to find a study partner. It is better if your partner enjoys the class because often their enthusiasm for the subject can rub off on you. Even if you both aren’t a fan of the class, simply studying with a friend can help. If you absolutely do not get along with anyone in the class, it can sometimes help to talk to the teacher before or after school and get them to honestly explain to you why they enjoy their subject. Again, the enthusiasm may rub off on you, or they may convince you that it is important by bringing something up that you never thought about.

If it is math that is not your thing, do not worry, you have MaThCliX! All of us here love math and it shows. Coming in often, even if you do not enjoy it at first, will make math (or any subject) at least bearable, if not phenomenal.